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Daily Habits to Improve Your Oral Health

Your oral health is always extremely important, whether you’re in braces or not! If you’re looking for some simple ways to boost your oral health, you’re in luck. Keep reading for some daily habits that you can incorporate into your routine from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics.

Some of the easiest ways to keep your oral health in tip-top shape are to do the simple things you have been told to do your whole life, like brushing your teeth. 

  • Proper brushing is an essential part of dental hygiene. Make sure you are brushing your teeth twice a day for at least two minutes each time. Don’t forget to brush your tongue too – plaque can build up on the surface of your tongue as well as your teeth! Also, be sure to use a toothpaste with fluoride, which helps prevent tooth decay.

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Are Dental X-Rays Safe

It is quite common that when you go to the dentist, they will take X-rays of your teeth. Dental X-rays are images of your teeth that your dentist will use to evaluate your oral health. These X-rays may seem complex, but they’re actually very common tools that are just as important as getting your teeth cleaned. Keep reading for more information about dental X-rays from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics.

You may be wondering if dental X-rays are safe. Fortunately, they are! This is because these X-rays are used with low levels of radiation to capture images of the interior of your teeth and gums. These X-rays are incredibly important because they can help your dentist to identify problems such as cavities, tooth decay, and impacted teeth. Dental X-rays are typically performed yearly. However, they may happen more often if your dentist is monitoring a problem or performing dental treatment.

Dental X-rays do involve radiation; however, the exposed levels are so low that they’re considered safe for children and adults. If your dentist uses digital X-rays instead of developing them on film, your risks from radiation exposure are even lower. Additionally, your dentist will also place a lead “bib” over your chest, abdomen, and pelvic region to prevent any unnecessary radiation exposure to your vital organs.

Pregnancy is an exception to the rule. Women who are currently, or planning on becoming pregnant, should avoid all types of X-rays. Be sure to communicate this with your doctor because radiation is not considered safe for developing fetuses. If you have more questions about dental X-rays or if there is any way we can help answer more dental questions, please contact our office.

How to Take Care of Your Retainer

Wrapping up your orthodontic treatment is an exciting time! Your hard work is rewarded with a beautiful smile. However, the work doesn’t end here. It is crucial that you continue to take great care of your teeth in order to maintain your new smile. This includes wearing your retainer, which allows your smile to last a lifetime. Keep reading for some advice on retainers from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics.

Retainers hold your teeth in their new positions while bone tissue rebuilds around them, stabilizing them. This process takes time, and it is important that you continue to wear your retainer after this process has been completed. Your bite can change over time as bone continues to break down and rebuild. Wearing your retainer will help preserve your smile throughout this process.

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Can My Bite Change?

As we go through life, we are in a constant state of change. We age each year, and with that, it is totally normal for our bodies to change too. This includes your teeth as well. Just as the seasons change, you can expect your teeth and bite to change over time. Continue reading for some advice from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics about how your bite can change over time.

Teeth are set in bone. Bone is a living tissue, thus it is in a constant state of change. Bone cells are broken down and rebuilt overtime. For bone in the jaws, this is caused by biting, chewing, swallowing and speaking. These actions place force on the teeth which can cause the bones to move and shift. Fortunately, it is a malleability of bones that allows orthodontic treatment to be possible and effective. 

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Can I Still Wear My Retainer if it Feels Tight?

Wearing your retainer is a crucial part of maintaining your new smile after your braces treatment is completed. However, your teeth can shift over time, especially if you neglect wearing your retainer. If you stop wearing your retainer and want to start again or it begins to feel tight, you can still wear it – in certain instances. Continue reading for some advice on retainer use from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics.

As long as your retainer doesn’t hurt and still fits over your teeth, you can wear it even if it feels tight. This probably means that your teeth have shifted. In this case, you should wear your retainer longer each day to prevent your teeth from moving further. You can start by wearing your retainer all day for a few days to encourage your teeth to move back into the correct positions.

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The Connection Between Athletes & Poor Oral Health

Athletes are typically praised for their high level of wellness and health. However, did you know athletes tend to have more teeth-related issues than most? A recent study found that untreated tooth decay and gum inflammation was still prevalent among elite athletes despite regular brushing and flossing. Keep reading for some athlete related dental advice from Dr. Glenn Sosebee and Dr. T. Todd Britt at Sosebee and Britt Orthodontics.

Some athletes’ tooth related issues stem from the consumption of high-acid drinks, gels and energy bars. These all can weaken tooth enamel and damage teeth due to high sugar content and acidity. Studies have shown that nearly half of elite endurance athletes had untreated tooth decay, and the majority of them had early signs of gum inflammation. This is despite these athletes otherwise having good oral hygiene habits.

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